Posts Tagged ‘africa’

Oral statement to Parliament on the Ebola crisis in DR Congo

20.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

Download logo By Rory Stewart Ebola is back, this time in the eastern DRC. It is the largest outbreak in the country’s history, the second largest in the world, and the first in a conflict zone. So far 1,209 people have died. And we must do much more to grip this situation. This is not ...

Department for International Development (DFID)
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By Rory Stewart

Ebola is back, this time in the eastern DRC. It is the largest outbreak in the country’s history, the second largest in the world, and the first in a conflict zone. So far 1,209 people have died. And we must do much more to grip this situation.

This is not a simple question of virus control. If it were we could simply repeat what we were able – at huge risk and cost – to do in Sierra Leone and Liberia – and even to some extent what the government of the DRC and the WHO were able to do in Equateur and western DRC in the first six months of last year, that is to get out into village after village, identifying all the cases, tracing all their contacts and the contacts of the contacts – and through preventing further chains of transmission, contain the outbreak.

But, this is not a situation like this, this is North Kivu, this is the centre of a conflict, dominated by dozens of separate armed groups, largely outside government control. Such groups have begun to attack and kill health-workers – meaning that key international experts have had to be withdrawn from the epicentre of the virus. And the decision not to allow this area to participate in the recent election partly on the grounds that it is an Ebola area has fuelled suspicions that Ebola is a fabrication developed by hostile political forces.

As a result, Mr Speaker, communities are reluctant to come forward when they have symptoms, they’re reluctant to change burial practices or accept the highly effective trial vaccine.

The Congolese army and government – which have successfully contained nine previous outbreaks over the last 45 years – is struggling to operate in the epicentre of this outbreak. And so too are the UN peace-keepers and the WHO.

And although this area is very dangerous and difficult to access, it is not sparsely populated. The epicentre of the outbreak is Butembo, which has a population of a million people. The surrounding areas contain almost 18 million people.

Now to be clear, the current disease profile poses – according to all our expert analysis here – at the moment only a low to negligible risk to the United Kingdom. So this statement should not be a cause for panic at home. But this outbreak is potentially devastating for the region. It could spread easily to neighbouring provinces and even to neighbouring countries.

Now I want to take a moment to commend all of those – both the Congolese Government and the international community – who are working in these very difficult situations to bring this disease under control. My predecessor, the Right Honourable member for Portsmouth North paid tribute to Dr Richard Valery Mouzoko Kiboung who was killed in an attack by an armed group on the 19th of April while working for WHO in the Ebola response on the frontline. I would like to, and I imagine the whole House would join with me in expressing deepest condolences to the family, friends and colleagues of Dr Richard and to all those who have lost loved ones as a result of this outbreak.

We now need to grip this situation and ensure that the disease is contained.

As you can imagine, this has been my key priority in the emergency field since I was appointed just over two weeks ago. I spent the weekend in discussions with Sir Mark Lowcock, the UN Humanitarian Coordinator, and with the Director-General of the WHO, Dr.Tedros, who has so far paid eight visits personally to the affected area.

I have also spoken about the response to the Deputy-Secretary-General of the UN, Amina Mohammed, and I am pleased to see that there has been a real step up in terms of the UN staff on the ground, in terms of coordination and in terms of the seniority of those staff, particularly in places like Butembo.

Both the Health Secretary and the Foreign Secretary have been supporting this agenda in recent meetings over the last four days, at the G7 health meeting and the WHO meetings in Geneva. I have also convened a meeting with a number of international experts in the field, including Brigadier Kevin Beaton, who helped to lead to the UK military response in Sierra Leone and Liberia, and the chief medical officer to the UK government,

I have concluded, on the basis of their advice, that we need not only to provide more money immediately to support the frontline response, that’s the health workers, but also to support the vaccination strategy and to put more of our expert staff on the ground, into the response.

This is not just about recruiting doctors – we need people who understand and can work with the DRC government, the military and even the opposition forces – in order to create the space for us to work.

We need people who know the UN system well so that they can drive and shape the UN response. And these people need to be not in London but on the ground because they need to be able to learn and adapt very quickly as the disease spreads.

We are already deploying epidemiologists through our Public Health Rapid Support Teams, in partnership with the Department of Health and Social Care. I am also considering deploying officials with specialities in information management, adaptive management, anthropology and strategic communications.

It is, however, important for us all to understand that this is not a problem that the international community can solve from a distance. This is a political and security crisis as much as a health crisis – and the response must, in the end, be driven by local health-workers and leaders.


But there are some positive signs.

DFID has been a key player in developing a new experimental vaccine for Ebola, which is proving highly effective.

Over 119 thousand doses have been administered in eastern DRC. This is an achievement that has probably saved thousands of lives. Modelling from Yale suggests that the use of the vaccine has reduced the geographic spread of Ebola by nearly 70%. And this isn’t just about statistics – this is about Danielle, a 42-day old baby in eastern Congo who survived Ebola last week thanks to the inspiring work of community volunteers, themselves Ebola survivors, and frontline health workers, supported by UK aid.

And of course we cannot do it alone. This needs grip and urgency – but it also needs humility.

Eastern DRC is one of the most difficult operating environments on earth. One of the reasons that I have been talking to in detail about this issue to Mark Green, who is my US opposite number – is not only that we share the US analysis but also that the Americans will inevitably be major players in this response – in terms of finance and in terms of expertise, as indeed they were in the Liberia Ebola outbreak.

We need many more international donors to match our financial contributions and to sustain the international and local health operations in the field. And this is why the UK has just hosted an event specifically on Ebola, to build support for the response in the World Health Assembly in Geneva. This is also why I have agreed that my colleague the Africa Minister, should visit Eastern DRC immediately.

To conclude, this is a very dangerous situation, where the Ebola virus is only one ingredient in a crisis which is fuelled by politics, community suspicion and armed violence.

We need to act fast, and we need to act generously. But above all we need the right people on the ground who are completely on top of the situation, who are able to come up with quick solutions, and guide us in keeping up the support and yes, sometimes the pressure, on the UN system, on NGOs, on opposition politicians, and the government of DRC to get this done.

The stakes are very high. I will keep the house updated on our response.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Department for International Development (DFID).
Source: Apo-Opa

UPDATED: Guterres condemns armed attack against UN peacekeepers in Mali

20.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

Download logo A violent attack against the United Nation's Integrated Stabilization Mission for Mali (MINUSMA) that left one peacekeeper dead on Saturday, drew strong condemnation from Secretary-General António Guterres.  Mr. Guterres is “deeply saddened at the death of a Nigerian peacekeeper who succumbed to his wounds following the armed attack by unidentified assailants in Timbuktu”, ...

United Nations (UN)
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A violent attack against the United Nation's Integrated Stabilization Mission for Mali (MINUSMA) that left one peacekeeper dead on Saturday, drew strong condemnation from Secretary-General António Guterres. 

Mr. Guterres is “deeply saddened at the death of a Nigerian peacekeeper who succumbed to his wounds following the armed attack by unidentified assailants in Timbuktu”, said his spokesperson, Stéphane Dujarric,  in a statement issued that evening.

The UN chief expressed his “heartfelt condolences” to the bereaved family and the Government of Nigeria and “wished a speedy recovery to another Nigerian peacekeeper who was wounded in the same attack”. 

He also wished a “swift recovery to three Chadian peacekeepers”, who were wounded when their mine-protected vehicle hit an improvised explosive device in Tessalit, Kidal region. 

The Secretary-General recalled that “attacks targeting United Nations peacekeepers may constitute war crimes under international law” and called on the Malian authorities to “take swift action to identify the perpetrators of these attacks and promptly bring them to justice”.

“The Secretary-General reaffirms the solidarity of United Nations with the people and the Government of Mali and its support to their quest for peace and stability”, Mr. Dujarric concluded.

Grounds for sanctions

For its part, the Security Council condemned “in the strongest terms” the attacks while also expressing their “deepest condolences and sympathy” to the victim’s family, to Nigeria and to MINUSMA.  

In a statement issued on Sunday, the Security Council members cited resolutions and stressed that any “involvement in planning, directing, sponsoring or conducting attacks” against MINUSMA peacekeepers “constitutes a basis for sanctions”.  

The Security Council reaffirmed that “terrorism in all its forms and manifestations constitutes one of the most serious threats to international peace and security” and underlined that the “perpetrators, organizers, financiers and sponsors of these reprehensible acts of terrorism” be brought to justice.  

Stating that those responsible “should be held accountable”, the Council urged all States, in accordance with their obligations under international law and relevant Security Council resolutions, “to cooperate actively with all relevant authorities in this regard”. 

“Any acts of terrorism are criminal and unjustifiable, regardless of their motivation, wherever, whenever and by whomsoever committed” they spelled out.  

All States must combat “by all means”, threats to international peace and security caused by terrorist acts, the statement continued. 
The Security Council said it fully supported Mahamat Saleh Annadif, Special Representative for Mali and Head of MINUSMA, the peacekeeping mission and the other security presences “in Mali and in the Sahel region”. 

Expressing concern over the country’s security situation and “the transnational dimension of the terrorist threat in the Sahel region”, the Council urged the nation’s parties to “fully implement the Agreement on Peace and Reconciliation in Mali without further delay” 

“The full implementation of the Agreement and the intensification of efforts to overcome asymmetric threats can contribute to improving the security situation across Mali” they said, underlining that the efforts of the Cross-Border Joint Force to counter the activities of terrorist groups and other organized criminal groups will “contribute to create a more secure environment in the Sahel region”. 

The Council members further stressed “he importance that MINUSMA has “the necessary capacities to fulfil its mandate and promote the safety and security of the United Nations peacekeepers, pursuant to Security Council resolution 2423 (2018)”. 

“These heinous acts” will not undermine the Council’s determination “to continue to support the peace and reconciliation process in Mali” the statement concluded. 

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of United Nations (UN).
Source: Apo-Opa

U.S. Firms will not be left behind as Energy Investments pick up in Angola’s Oil Sector

20.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

Angola has emerged as the hub of foreign direct investments within Africa, and the prospects of attracting more FDI this year are bright, particularly in the country’s oil and gas sector. The ambitious reform agenda of President João Laurenço and that of the Minister of Mineral Resources and Petroleum, Dr. Diamantino Pedro Azevedo, has already ...

African Energy Chamber

Angola has emerged as the hub of foreign direct investments within Africa, and the prospects of attracting more FDI this year are bright, particularly in the country’s oil and gas sector. The ambitious reform agenda of President João Laurenço and that of the Minister of Mineral Resources and Petroleum, Dr. Diamantino Pedro Azevedo, has already resulted in increased investment from the country’s biggest European operators. This current state of play now presents an opportunity for North American companies to re-engage and re-invest in the Angolan market.

“Angola has repositioned itself as a strategic oil investment hub and has made itself attractive to American oil firms to take a new look as Africa becomes once again a target for the US oil industry,” said Jude Kearney, former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Service Industries and Finance at the U.S. Department of Commerce during the Clinton Administration and President of Kearney Africa. “American and many other foreign investors are paying close attention to the wave of reforms in Angola and will embrace it by investing their dollars. The Angola Oil & Gas Conference on June 4-6, championed by the President, will be key in this regard.”

Angola, the second-biggest oil producer in Africa after Nigeria, has just released a new oil licensing strategy up to 2025, and is about to launch next month and for the first time a bidding round that includes marginal oil fields with an attractive fiscal framework. Angola’s economic recovery is being driven by investments in the country’s oil and gas sector, with the country’s energy sector attracting well over $1bn of investment commitments over the past few months.

The charge is notably led by international oil companies increasing the size of their operations in the country, including Total at Kaombo, ExxonMobil in the Namibe Basin or BP at the Platina Field. US oil & gas service companies like Halliburton or Baker Hughes GE also still dominate the sector and are likely to further invest in technology as the country ramps up exploration efforts. American firms have traditionally led investments within Angola’s oil sector, especially under the Strategic Partnership Agreement the US has with Angola, one of just three in sub-Saharan Africa.

“Angola is back and the oil and gas sector is posed to rebound after the economic recession. We believe the new investment must also include strong support for job creators in the oil sector and for the socio-economic empowerment of Angolans. The market-driven policies are working, and we will encourage the oil industry and the government to work together and do more deals,” declared Sergio Pugliese, President of the African Energy Chamber (EnergyChamber.org) in Angola.

Eni’s recent light oil discovery this year in Block 15/06 confirmed that Angola does not disappoint for whoever is ready to bet on the country’s vast reserves.

“Seeing new oil discoveries in Angola, is yet again great news that there is still a lot more oil and gas to be found in Angola and also solidifies the impression of many US firms that Angola is still the place to be. The gas potential is massive and US technology, if used properly, will redefine Angola’s gas market. Angola has been smart to work hand in hand with US investors and the African Energy Chamber to ensure its reforms meet market demands,” stated C. Derek Campbell, Chief Executive Officer of TransGen Energy, Inc., an integrated global energy conglomerate based out of Maryland.

“This sends a strong message to the industry and we will continue to advocate for the presence of US companies when in comes putting world class fields into development and also focusing on exploration as there is no production without investing in exploration to find more oil,” added Sergio Pugliese,

The African Energy Chamber (AEC) is the only Africa-wide association that represents all aspects of Africa’s oil and gas industry. The AEC represents more than 120 partners involved in all aspects of the African energy industry.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of African Energy Chamber.

Media Contact:
Africa Energy Chamber of Commerce
Suite 24 Katherine & West 114 West Street
Sandton
Johannesburg
South Africa
Website: www.EnergyChamber.org
Phone (SA): +27 11 245 5900

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Source: Apo-Opa

The Sudan – Impact of Early Warning Early Action

20.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

Download logo Climate-driven hazards are increasing in intensity and frequency, with weather‑related crises now occurring nearly five times as often as 40 years ago. At the same time, needs are expanding and resources are limited. New tools and ways of thinking and acting are essential to reduce the impact of these disasters as effectively as ...

Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
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Climate-driven hazards are increasing in intensity and frequency, with weather‑related crises now occurring nearly five times as often as 40 years ago. At the same time, needs are expanding and resources are limited. New tools and ways of thinking and acting are essential to reduce the impact of these disasters as effectively as possible.

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) is developing innovative early warning systems to anticipate risks and intervene at the right time. The right time is often early – before a crisis becomes a humanitarian disaster. FAO’s approach is shifting from a reactive mind-set to one focused on mitigation and prevention.

When the state of Kassala in eastern Sudan experienced a dry spell in 2017 and 2018, FAO took steps early to protect the livelihoods of vulnerable agropastoralists. This study analyses the outcomes of FAO's Early Warning Early Action (EWEA) approach in the Sudan. They complement and reinforce earlier findings in EthiopiaKenya, and Somalia which demonstrated that early actions have a significant return on investment and are an effective way to address drought in Africa’s agropastoralist regions.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).
Source: Apo-Opa

Somalia: $710 million needed to scale up drought response and avert a major crisis

20.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

Download logo As Somalia faces another severe drought, aid agencies today launched a Drought Response Plan and called for urgent and sustained resources to avert a major crisis. The plan seeks $710 million to provide critical, life-saving assistance to 4.5 million drought-affected Somalis in the most severely affected areas between now and the end of December. The ...

Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA)
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As Somalia faces another severe drought, aid agencies today launched a Drought Response Plan and called for urgent and sustained resources to avert a major crisis. The plan seeks $710 million to provide critical, life-saving assistance to 4.5 million drought-affected Somalis in the most severely affected areas between now and the end of December.

The 2019 Gu rains (April-June) have dismally failed, resulting in a second consecutive below-average rainy season while Somalia is still recovering from the impact of the prolonged 2016-17 drought. Except the 2018 Gu (April-June), every rainy season since late 2015 has been below average, leading to increased vulnerability and decreased coping ability. The 2019 Gu is the third driest on record since the early 1980s and has resulted in widespread crop failure and accelerated decline in livestock productivity.
Consequently, the number of people in crisis and emergency levels of food insecurity or worse is expected to reach 2.2 million by July, if aid is not scaled up. This is more than 40 per cent higher than January this year. Malnutrition, drought-related diseases and displacement are on the rise.

“The drought situation in Somalia has deteriorated rapidly and intensified much earlier than seen over the last decade. Somalia is at a critical juncture, and with sufficient resources, we can reactivate the structures that successfully avoided famine in 2017,” said George Conway, the acting Humanitarian Coordinator for Somalia. “As we continue to work under the leadership of Somali authorities to rebuild resilience and address the underlying causes of such recurrent crises, it is now critical that everyone, including donors, the private sector, Somalis in-country and in the diaspora, rallies behind these collective response and prevention efforts,” he added.

The impact of the drought threatens to reverse gains made in 2018. Immediate scale-up in humanitarian response is required to mitigate the effects of the latest drought that threatens to drive Somalia into a major humanitarian crisis, complemented by development efforts through the Government’s Resilience and Recovery Framework, to ensure that Somalia is better prepared to face future shocks of this nature. Limited resources constrain aid agencies’ ability to launch a massive response, and activities are scaling back, including in critical sectors such as WASH, health, nutrition and food assistance in several drought-affected areas and urban centres receiving newly displaced people.

The 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan, which seeks $1.08 billion, is only 20 per cent funded amid growing needs.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).
Source: Apo-Opa

Photo Exhibition on Fatherhood in Egypt and Sweden at Bibliotheca Alexandrina

20.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

Download logo On the 9th May 2019, the Embassy of Sweden inaugurated the exhibition “Because I am a Father: Egyptian and Swedish Dads” in Alexandria. The exhibition features photos from Egypt and Sweden, portraying the universal role of fatherhood and promoting cultural exchange and gender equality. The exhibit will be open 9th-28th May in Bibliotheca ...

Embassy of Sweden in Cairo
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On the 9th May 2019, the Embassy of Sweden inaugurated the exhibition “Because I am a Father: Egyptian and Swedish Dads” in Alexandria. The exhibition features photos from Egypt and Sweden, portraying the universal role of fatherhood and promoting cultural exchange and gender equality. The exhibit will be open 9th-28th May in Bibliotheca Alexandrina.

The project is a joint undertaking by Bibliotheca Alexandrina, the National Council for Women, the Swedish Institute (SI) in Stockholm, the Swedish Embassy, and UN Women Egypt. One part of the exhibition portraits 25 Swedish dads on parental leave and depicts their views on parental leave and how their choice to stay home with their children has affected their relationships to their children and their partners. The other part of the exhibition showcases approximately 20 Egyptian dads and how they engage in their children’s lives. The Egyptian fathers also share their thoughts on parenthood and on what their everyday lives look like.

The exhibition will be open to the public Saturday to Thursday until 28th May, from 10am to 2pm.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Embassy of Sweden in Cairo.
Source: Apo-Opa

U.S. Embassy, National Electoral Board of Ethiopia (NEBE) hold Communications Workshop for Political Parties

20.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

The U.S. Embassy in partnership with the National Electoral Board of Ethiopia – NEBE – organized a half-day communications workshop for members of political parties in Ethiopia.  The workshop focused on supporting the communications capability of the parties as they prepare for upcoming elections. In his remarks at the workshop, U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia Michael ...

U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

The U.S. Embassy in partnership with the National Electoral Board of Ethiopia – NEBE – organized a half-day communications workshop for members of political parties in Ethiopia. 

The workshop focused on supporting the communications capability of the parties as they prepare for upcoming elections.

In his remarks at the workshop, U.S. Ambassador to Ethiopia Michael Raynor explained that “To have so many different political parties gathered in one place, and in a government building no less, is a testament to how far Ethiopia has come over the last year. But creating this new political space, as difficult and momentous as this has been, is just the first step. Now the question is what Ethiopians will do with it.”

The Ambassador also encouraged the participants to look beyond winning or losing and think about how they can lead Ethiopia’s transition: “Whether your party wins or loses any given election, your leadership role within Ethiopia’s new political space is doing nothing less than ensuring Ethiopia’s peaceful, multi-party future.”

The workshop was open to all political parties focused on the myriad ways they can connect with their constituencies and the general public while putting forward their policies and vision for Ethiopia so that the Ethiopian people can make informed choices when casting their vote in the upcoming election.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

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Source: Apo-Opa

U.S. Embassy hosts Ethiopia Hacks! 5.0: River Basin Restoration

20.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

The U.S. Embassy in Addis Ababa hosted the Fifth Hackathon as part of its Ethiopia Hacks! Program.  Participants were challenged to develop technological solutions to support the Addis Ababa river basin restoration project. To help participants get started, the U.S. Embassy brought U.S. expert Dr. Melinda Laturi, Professor of Eco System Science and Sustainability Director ...

U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

The U.S. Embassy in Addis Ababa hosted the Fifth Hackathon as part of its Ethiopia Hacks! Program.  Participants were challenged to develop technological solutions to support the Addis Ababa river basin restoration project.

To help participants get started, the U.S. Embassy brought U.S. expert Dr. Melinda Laturi, Professor of Eco System Science and Sustainability Director at Colorado State University to share her experience using technological solutions to clean rivers and keep them clean. Addis Ababa Deputy Commissioner for Environmental Protection and Green Development Commission- Gutama Moroda also addressed participants.

At the end of the program, each team presented their concepts to a panel four judges to compete for first, second, and third place prizes. The first place team was Team Blue, a group from HiLCoE- School of Computer Science and Technology.

Team Blue’s solution would use web-based data collection with the Telegram application, which can share GPS information from where the data/information about a river is sent. The application accepts text and pictures about the river, which could be used to help target interventions and protect the river from pollution.

Ethiopia Hacks! is conducted in partnership with the Google Developers Group (GDG- Addis) and the Centre for Accelerated Women’s Economic Empowerment (CAWEE).  Each hackathon invites ten teams of five young coders to invent technological solutions to challenges in Ethiopia.

By supporting and developing an eco-system that promotes innovation, and technology, the U.S. Embassy is investing in the capacity of Ethiopians to shape their future. In total, the Ethiopia Hacks! Program will invest in the capacity of 600 tech-savvy youth, over the course of 12 Hackathons. Funding is provided jointly by the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

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U.S. Embassy Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
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Source: Apo-Opa

Peter Eriksson travels to Tanzania and Mozambique

20.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

Download logo Sweden has extensive development cooperation with both of these countries, and has been committed to helping them combat poverty since they gained independence. During his visit, Mr Eriksson will meet a range of actors, including government representatives, human rights defenders, civil society organisations and multilateral actors. In Tanzania, Mr Eriksson will visit a ...

Government Offices of Sweden, Ministry for Foreign Affairs
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Sweden has extensive development cooperation with both of these countries, and has been committed to helping them combat poverty since they gained independence. During his visit, Mr Eriksson will meet a range of actors, including government representatives, human rights defenders, civil society organisations and multilateral actors.

In Tanzania, Mr Eriksson will visit a number of cooperation projects targeting issues such as human rights, agricultural development, renewable energy and education. Focus will be on discussing developments in the area of democracy and human rights, the economic outlook, and natural resource management and biodiversity.

In Mozambique, Mr Eriksson will first visit Maputo, then travel to Beira, where focus will be on humanitarian efforts following cyclone Idai and reconstruction of the region. Climate and environmental issues, and enhanced resilience in the event of natural disasters will also be addressed.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Government Offices of Sweden, Ministry for Foreign Affairs.
Source: Apo-Opa

WHO announces four new goodwill ambassadors for promoting global health

20.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

Download logo World Health Organization today announced today the appointment of four new goodwill ambassadors, from the fields of sports, politics and community mobilization, to promote healthier lives, stronger health workforces and improved mental health globally. The new ambassadors are: Alisson Becker, goalkeeper of the Brazilian national and Liverpool football teams, and Dr Natália Loewe ...

World Health Organization (WHO)
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World Health Organization today announced today the appointment of four new goodwill ambassadors, from the fields of sports, politics and community mobilization, to promote healthier lives, stronger health workforces and improved mental health globally.

The new ambassadors are:

  • Alisson Becker, goalkeeper of the Brazilian national and Liverpool football teams, and Dr Natália Loewe Becker, medical doctor and health advocate from Brazil, as WHO Goodwill Ambassadors for Health Promotion;
  • Cynthia Germanotta, President of Born This Way Foundation, which co-founded with her daughter, Lady Gaga, as WHO Goodwill Ambassador for mental health;
  • Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, former President of Liberia, as WHO Goodwill Ambassador for Health Workforce.

 
The announcements were made by WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus in his speech to open the 72nd World Health Assembly in Geneva. 

“I welcome President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Cynthia Germanotta, Alisson Becker and Natália Loewe Becker as WHO’s new Goodwill Ambassadors and look forward to working with them over the coming years,” said Dr Tedros. “Each of our new ambassadors are champions in their own right, from helping their communities rebuild and develop sustainably, to fighting for better mental health and wellbeing, to being role models for healthier living.”

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of World Health Organization (WHO).
Source: Apo-Opa