His Highness Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed, Egyptian President review regional developments

16.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

United Arab Emirates Ministry of Foreign Affairs & International Coperation

His Highness Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, has re-affirmed the UAE's determination to ensure uninterrupted global oil supplies and the safety of maritime navigation, while sparing no effort to stand up to any menacing threats by any party “whosoever” to the global economy.

“The myriad challenges besetting the region entails an efficient pan-Arab re-action that protects the supreme interests of Arab nations and helps achieve their peoples' ambitions for security, stability and peace,” His Highness Sheikh Mohamed said, underlining the country's keenness to continue consultations and exchange of views with the Arab Republic of Egypt over the latest regional and international developments.

The Abu Dhabi Crown Prince, who arrived in Cairo earlier today, made the statements during his meeting with Egyptian President Abdel Fatah el-Sisi, who re-affirmed his country's solidarity with the UAE and Saudi Arabia against all attempts to undermine their security and stability.

“Targeting tankers and oil facilities is a grave development that poses a significant menacing threat to the entire world, not to the affected countries only,” Sheikh Mohamed added, expressing his appreciation of the supportive stance adopted by Egypt toward UAE and Saudi Arabia in this regard.

His Highness Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, during his meeting with the Egyptian President, underscored the pivotal role played by Egypt as a major Arab power that enjoys a significant clout on the regional and world stage.

The meeting, attended by H.H. Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Presidential Affairs, and H.H. Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, addressed prospects of further advancing bilateral relations across multiple domains.

“The UAE is always keen to exchange views with the Egyptian leadership about the sources of threats to regional security, including the recent terrorist and sabotage acts that targeted commercial vessels off the UAE waters and Saudi oil facilities over the past few days,” Sheikh Mohamed added.

“The UAE-Egyptian relations are a robust tenet for regional security and stability, as the two countries are working together to counter terrorism and extremism and to stand up to any attempts to meddle into the internal affairs of Arab countries. We both endeavor to protect our states against the malicious agendas of armed militias in a way that supports the development of Arab countries and their peoples' rights to a decent life away from conflicts and destructive disputes,” Sheikh Mohamed continued to say.

For his part, the Egyptian president reiterated his condemnation of the sabotage acts against four commercial vessels off the UAE waters and the oil facilities in Saudi Arabia, decrying the two developments as a menacing threat to regional and international security.

The two leaders reaffirmed their solidarity with Saudi Arabia against all attempts to undermine its security and stability, with the Egyptian president accentuating that the stability of the Gulf region is an integral part of Egypt's national security.

They doubled on the importance of maintaining the highest level of coordination to confront the besetting challenges and counter all threats to Arab security and stability.

Attending the meeting were Dr. Sultan bin Ahmad Sultan Al Jaber, Minister of State; Ali bin Hammad Al Shamsi, Deputy Secretary-General of the Supreme National Security Council; and Khaldoon Khalifa Al Mubarak, Chairman of Abu Dhabi Executive Affairs Authority; along with Mohamed Mubarak Al Mazrouei, Undersecretary of the CPC, Sultan Rashid Al Shamsi, Executive-Director at CPC, UAE Ambassador to Egypt Jumaa Mubarak Al-Junaibi, and Mohamed Al Abbar, Chairman of Emaar Properties along with a number of ministers and key officials from the Egyptian side.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of United Arab Emirates Ministry of Foreign Affairs & International Coperation.

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Transformed peace actors and government leaders trained to manage conflicts in Eastern Equatoria

16.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS)

MOSES YAKUDU

For some, it was a workshop. For others, it was a near-transcendental experience.

“We feel empowered, even transformed, by the information received on how to resolve disputes peacefully. We will participate alongside our elders for peace. Only brains work, not weapons,” says Clement Lotao, chairperson of the youth in Kimotong County, with an air of indestructible conviction.

“We now know what to say to our husbands and the community to bring peace home,” Christine, leader of a women’s group, chipped in.

Recommendations made two years ago during a civil-military dialogue between the South Sudan People's Defence Forces and the six communities of Kimotong County have, slowly, given birth to this potentially life-changing capacity building workshop.

The two-day training, organized by the United Nations Mission in South Sudan, brought together 60 participants, including women, influential youth, traditional priests, representatives of the organized forces and the paramount chief of the area. Those fortunate enough to be in attendance acquired skills in conflict management and mitigation to help reduce tensions within Kimotong County, and with their neighbours.

 “Our traditional approach to conflict normally does not satisfy those involved and may sometimes make things worse. With these new skills, it will be possible for each party to walk away in peace,” explained Joseph Kamilo Napengiro, a representative of the Kapoeta government, engaging in self-reflection.

Kimotong County has a long history of conflicts between the community of Buya and the South Sudan People’s Defence Forces deployed in the area. According to the government forces, ambushes and several clashes with the community have resulted in the premature death of more than 60 soldiers between 2016 to 2019.

“Guns in the hands of our young people means they lack respect for the elders. Our cultural values, inherited from our forefathers, are practically lost,” lamented parish priest Father Alfred Loguti. “We have to go back to our roots.”

According to traditional priest Lino Nawalaki, more transformative assistance from the peacekeeping mission will be needed to restore tranquil relations in the area.

“We believe the next step for us is for a ‘peace dialogue’ between the Kimotong communities and our neighbours, so we can resolve our differences.”

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS).

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Bentiu-bound verification team vows to leave no stone unturned to remove children from armed forces

16.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS)

BEATRICE MATEGWA/FILIP ANDERSSON

A joint team from South Sudan’s government and opposition forces has arrived in South Sudan’s northern town of Bentiu, on a verification mission aimed at removing children from the country’s military ranks.

Along with officials from the United Nations Mission in South Sudan, representatives of the UN International Children’s Emergency Fund, Unicef, and the National Disarmament, Demobilization and Reintegration Commission are part of the travelling party.

“We want to show to everybody that we are committed and working jointly for the revitalized peace agreement,” says Major General Chaplain Khamis Edward, who heads the Child Protection Unit of the South Sudan People’s Defence Forces and leads the verification team, before boarding the flight from the country’s capital Juba.

The process of extracting children from armed forces involves requesting the soldiers of each army unit to be visited over the next seven days to line up for a physical inspection.

The team will have to go line by line, and when we see a child, then we can move that child out,” the Major General explains.

Thousands of children, boys and girls under the age of 18, have served the military since the decades-long war of South Sudan’s independence. Since civil war broke out in December 2013, they have also been used opposition forces.

A peace agreement signed in September last year stipulates that parties refrain from the “recruitment and/or use of child soldiers by armed forces or militia in contravention of international conventions.” Both parties have also signed a number of specific agreements and agreed on a national action plan to that effect.

Alfred Orono Orono, head of the peacekeeping mission’s Child Protection Unit, points out that this joint verification effort is unique, but will be followed by similar exercises in other parts of the country.

“For the first time people who have been fighting each other have agreed to work together, and they are showing it. They are sending a message to the people of South Sudan,” he says, and spells out that it is a message of unity between armed forces and the people to bring peace to the country, particularly to its long-suffering children and women.

The onset of the rainy season, which makes travelling along the precarious roads of the country, will not stop the verification team from getting its essential work done.

“We are looking at children going back to school. We are looking at internally displaced people returning to their homes, because the schools are now safe for their children, and the hospitals are now available to them,” the child protection chief says.

“I feel that there is no better time than this time,” agrees Major General David Nyang, representing South Sudan’s Opposition Alliance. “It is never too late to start and to achieve what we have not managed in the past eight months.”

Lieutenant General Wesley Samson, from the opposition forces and Chairperson of the Joint Transitional Security Committee, emphasized that it is not only the presence of children in the armed forces that will be verified.

“It [the verification team] can also address the grievances of civilians, like the removal of forces from civilian centres and schools,” he said.

On his part, Kuot Kuot Deng from the National Disarmament, Demobilization Commission noted that the verification of the presence of children in the military ranks is important ahead of the integration of soldiers into one national army, another key provision of the revitalized peace agreement.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS).

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U.S. Ambassador Honors 2019 Mandela Washington Fellows

16.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

Embassy of the United States - Accra - Ghana

On Wednesday, May 15, 2019, U.S. Ambassador to Ghana Stephanie S. Sullivan hosted a reception in honor of the 2019 Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI) Mandela Washington Fellowship (MWF) cohort. In attendance were Ghanaian alumni from YALI and other U.S. Government exchange programs from previous years.

Since the inception of the Fellowship, the U.S. Government has committed significant resources to enhancing leadership skills, bolstering entrepreneurship, and connecting young leaders from across Sub-Saharan Africa. This year, the U.S. Embassy in Ghana selected 32 Ghanaians, through a rigorous competitive process. They comprise leaders from business, the public sector, and non-governmental organizations. 

In her remarks, Ambassador Sullivan extoled the virtues of the MWF program, saying, “These exchange programs not only provide professional skills and networking opportunities, they also form friendships and bonds between our two countries.” She added, “This goodwill leads to sustained relationships with tangible outcomes that contribute positively to Ghana’s development.”

A total of 700 African leaders between the ages of 25-35 will participate in the Fellowship and hone their skills at a U.S. higher education institution with support for further professional development after they return to their home countries. The Fellowship focuses on leadership and skills development in one of three tracks: Business, Public Management, or Civic Engagement

The Mandela Washington Fellowship is the flagship program of YALI. Launched in 2010, YALI seeks to invest in the next generation of African leaders to spur growth and prosperity, strengthen democratic governance, and enhance peace and security across Sub-Saharan Africa. The initiative contains three programs – the Mandela Washington Fellowship, the YALI Regional Leadership Center Program, and the on-line platform YALI Network.  To learn more, visit yali.state.gov. 

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Embassy of the United States – Accra – Ghana.

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Diakonia focus of seminar in West African Republic of Bénin

16.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

World Council of Churches (WCC)

A seminar on human resources and leadership development for diakonia was held in the West African Republic of Bénin from 13-17 May.

Representatives from churches and church-related organisations gathered for a capacity-building seminar, financed by funds from Brot fuer die Welt, on diakonia and development. Participants came from French-speaking countries across Africa.

Sessions explored issues of enhancing leadership capabilities in development and diakonia through creative leadership, strategic planning, time management, optimal use of resources and other aspects of effective leadership in a Christian context.

The programme was developed by the World Council of Churches (WCC) with support from the All Africa Conference of Churches. Rev. Matthew Ross, WCC programme executive for Diakonia and Capacity Building, said: “This seminar has been an excellent example of ecumenical co-operation to develop work in leadership capacities in the church in Francophone African nations.

“Effective leadership and management skills are essential for effective diakonal and development work; this seminar has helped to enhance such skills.

“This has also been an important opportunity to highlight priorities for the World Council of Churches, especially the Thursdays in Black campaign addressing violence against women. I am looking forward to the two further seminars in this series in Nairobi and Maputo.”

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of World Council of Churches (WCC).

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Operational update on Cyclone Kenneth: Reaching communities cut off from aid

16.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)

As days of rain, flood-waters and high winds from Cyclone Kenneth recede, the catastrophic destruction left behind is becoming clearer.

Tens of thousands of people are homeless and little remains in many communities where homes, schools, businesses and places of worship once stood. In order to support communities reeling from the impact of Cyclone Kenneth in Cabo Delgado province, Mozambique, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) is working with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and the Mozambique Red Cross Society to provide assistance.

“As our teams reach communities flattened and destroyed by high winds and rain, we are deeply concerned about the urgent humanitarian needs that families face. We are distributing items such as tarpaulins, sleeping mats and kitchen sets to help alleviate residents’ suffering,” said Hannah Matthews, who is leading ICRC’s relief efforts from Pemba, Mozambique.

Humanitarian Concerns

  • Tens of thousands of people have been left homeless by the storm. Even as the water levels go down, many communities are still stranded and living completely exposed to the elements. Houses were flattened, roofs were yanked off their homes, trees snapped in half in the middle of communities and belongings washed and blown away.
  • There is an urgent need for shelter, water, food and other supplies in Pemba city as well as Macomia, Quissanga and Ibo districts, where some communities have been largely cut-off after the storm destroyed key infrastructure.
  • A cholera outbreak confirmed a week after Cyclone Kenneth struck further intensifies the vulnerability communities in Cabo Delgado face. The authorities and humanitarian community have rapidly begun to address this, however the scale of the outbreak and its possible impact remain unknown.
  • The destruction of key roads, bridges, and other infrastructure makes it complicated for humanitarian agencies to access communities. We are also closely monitoring the evolution of the situation to ensure that our teams of aid workers can safely access and assist communities that urgently need support.

Operational Notes

  • Teams are being deployed from ICRC’s office in Pemba, Mozambique. Distributions of relief supplies started and will continue for the coming month with communities receiving blankets, tarpaulins, and kitchen sets. So far we have assisted 978 families (about 4,900 people) in Pemba City, Matemo Island and Macomia Sede, and we are planning further distributions.
  • Staff are working with volunteers from the Mozambique Red Cross Society to set up systems to reconnect separated family members. This includes registering details of people who are missing and offering free phone calls for people to get in touch with their loved ones to let them know they are safe.
  • The ICRC is coordinating and working closely with the International Federation of the Red Cross and Mozambique Red Cross Society in implementing its humanitarian assistance efforts to rapidly reach as many of the affected communities as possible.
  • The ICRC set up an office in Pemba, Mozambique in September 2018 to address the humanitarian consequences of the armed violence there since October 2017. The ICRC has been carrying out regular visits to places of detention in and around Pemba city since then. These visits are carried out after access was authorized by the Mozambican authorities. Cyclone Kenneth’s landfall came as the ICRC was preparing to increase its response to the humanitarian needs caused by armed violence in Cabo Delgado province.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC).

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Madagascar Implements the International Monetary Fund’s Enhanced General Data Dissemination System

16.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

International Monetary Fund (IMF)
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Madagascar has implemented the recommendations of the IMF’s Enhanced General Data Dissemination System (e-GDDS) by publishing critical data through the National Summary Data Page (NSDP). The page aims to serve as a one-stop publication vehicle for essential macroeconomic data on the national accounts, government operations and debt, monetary and financial sectors, and balance of payments. These data will be disseminated in both human- and machine-readable formats. The e-GDDS was established by the IMF’s Executive Board in May 2015 to support improved data transparency, encourage statistical development, and help create synergies between data dissemination and surveillance.

The NSDP is posted on the webpage for Madagascar that is hosted on the open-data platform sponsored by the African Development Bank. A link to Madagascar’s NSDP is also available on the IMF’s Dissemination Standards Bulletin Board. The NSDP contains links to statistics published by the Ministry of Economy and Finance, the National Institute of Statistics, and the Central Bank of Madagascar.

Publication of essential macroeconomic data through the NSDP will provide national policy makers and domestic and international stakeholders, including investors and rating agencies, with easy access to information critical for monitoring economic conditions and policies. Making this information easily accessible in both human- and machine-readable formats will allow users to have simultaneous access to timely data and bring greater data transparency.

Louis Marc Ducharme, Chief Statistician and Data Officer, and Director of the IMF’s Statistics Department, welcomed this major milestone in the country’s statistical development. “I am confident that Madagascar will benefit from using the e-GDDS as a framework for further development of its statistical system.”

Madagascar has benefitted from a project on the Improvement of Data Dissemination financed by the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of International Monetary Fund (IMF).
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New WHO Representative in Sierra Leone presents credentials to the Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation

16.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

WHO Regional Office for Africa

The newly appointed Representative of the World Health Organization Country Office in Sierra Leone, Mr Evans Majani Liyosi, today 15 May 2019 presented his credentials to the Acting Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, Hon Nimatulai Bah Chang , in Freetown. This engagement now gives Mr Liyosi the official recognition by the government to represent the Organization in Sierra Leone.

Mr Liyosi is from Kenya and was formerly the acting WHO Representative in the Republic of South Sudan. He is bringing to his new post more than 20 years of experience in public health management and leadership and high technical expertise in the control of communicable disease. He has worked on health emergencies, surveillance, reproductive health and other strategic public health areas and has worked with WHO for more than 10 years at different managerial and technical levels in several countries. He also has a good experience working in the government and NGO sectors.

Formally receiving Mr Liyosi in his new capacity on behalf of the government of Sierra Leone, Hon Chang expressed appreciation to the World Health Organization for the continued support to the country’s health systems and reaffirms the government’s commitment in providing the conducive environment to carry out its mandates. “Sierra Leone has always been a home for previous WHO Representatives and I hope you will also enjoy the same relationship like your predecessor”, she added

The new Representative thanked the government for the recognition and close collaboration while reassuring WHO continued technical assistance. “I am here to support the Ministry of Health and Sanitation in achieving its set health priorities, strengthen coordination with health development partners in achieving the Sustainable Development Goal-3 focusing on the triple billion which aims to ensure that one billion more people are enjoying better health and wellbeing; one billion more people are better protected from health emergencies and one billion more people are benefitting from Universal Health Coverage”.

Mr Liyosi takes over as WHO Representative from Mr Alexander Chimbaru, who served as the Officer In Charge of the Sierra Leone Country Office since June 2017. Mr Liyosi’s initial official activities have included high level engagements with national authorities, donors, health sector development partners and the civil society

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of WHO Regional Office for Africa.

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Africa advances on goal of cervical cancer elimination across the continent

16.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

WHO Regional Office for Africa

The cervical cancer burden falls unequally on Africa, with 19 of the 20 most affected countries on this continent. The disease kills 311 000 women a year worldwide and is the second most common cancer among women in the African region. Yet, cervical cancer is one of the most preventable and curable forms of cancers, through vaccination, early detection and treatment. Bringing cervical cancer to an end is now a priority for the World Health Organization (WHO).

“With rates for cervical cancer up to six times higher in the African region than in North America, we can see that the disease is one of inequity,” said Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa. “We expect the new global strategy to close this gap.”

 At a consultation, held from 13-15 May and organized by the WHO Regional Office in Brazzaville, Republic of Congo, WHO Member States, academia, civil society and UN partners reviewed the draft Global Strategy Towards Cervical Cancer Elimination.

The regional perspective was provided to the draft strategy, and it was agreed that a framework for accelerating and implementing the new global strategy to eliminate cervical cancer in the African region is paramount. Participants agreed with the suggested elimination threshold of less than four cases per 100 000 people per year as well as to the 90/70/90 targets. These targets refer to 90% of women fully vaccinated by the age of 15, 70 % of women screened with a high-precision test by 35 years of age and 90% of women with cervical disease receiving appropriate treatment and care.

“In many parts of Africa, cervical cancer is not identified or treated until it has reached an advanced stage due to insufficient access to health care services, effective screening and early treatment” said Dr. Joseph Caboré, Director for Programme Management, WHO Regional Office for Africa. “We must ensure every woman has access to screening, and those diagnosed with pre-cancer and early invasive cervical cancer receive affordable, effective, and quality treatment.”

Participants emphasized the need for the global strategy to be accompanied by clear funding mechanisms for its implementation.

During the consultation, the energy, enthusiasm and passion for ending the scourge of cervical cancer as a public health problem in the African region was evident in all the country presentations, discussions. Input into the draft global strategy was overwhelming.

Cervical cancer is caused by the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), which is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract. Risk factors associated with cervical cancer include; early sexual activity, multiple sexual partners, exposure to other sexually transmitted infections such as HIV and smoking among others. The disease can be prevented through vaccination for girls aged 9 to 14 years, the ages at which the vaccine has the highest immune response; routine cervical cancer screening for all women aged 30–49 years and early treatment for those with pre-cancerous lesions as recommended by WHO.

Strategies to address cervical cancer and achieve treatment for all need to deal with health inequities that arise from the societal conditions in which women are born, grow, live and work. Barriers to education, employment, housing and a healthy environment must also be mitigated. Cultural and socioeconomic factors that limit cancer screening, early detection and care must be taken into account.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of WHO Regional Office for Africa.

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FAO raises alarm over disastrous drought in Somalia where over 2 million people face severe hunger

16.May.2019 · Posted in APO-OPA

Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)

A disastrous drought in Somalia could leave some 2.2 million people – nearly 18 percent of the population – faced with severe hunger during the July-September period, FAO warned today.

The UN agency issued a special alert on Somalia, indicating that the number of hungry people in the country this year is expected to be 40 percent higher than estimates made at the beginning of 2019.

A deteriorating nutritional status is also of major concern, according to the alert. Acute malnutrition rates as well as the number of acutely malnourished children being admitted to therapeutic feeding centres have sharply increased in 2019.

“Rains in April and early May can make or break Somalis' food security for the whole year as they are crucial for the country's main annual harvest in July, following the “Gu” rainy season,” said Mario Zappacosta, FAO Senior Economist and lead of the Global Information and Early Warning System (GIEWS).

“A significant lack of rains in April and early May has rendered dry and barren up to 85 percent of the croplands in the country's breadbaskets, and according to the latest projections, food grown during the “Gu” season is likely to be 50 percent below average,” he added.

The latest projection is based on data gathered by FAO experts – including sophisticated analyses of rainfall, temperatures, water availability and vegetation health – that point to the worst drought in years. Some rains are expected in May, but these will be insufficient and arrive too late for crop and pasture recovery before the onset of the dry season.  

For example, in Somalia's Lower Shabelle region, which produces more than 60 percent of maize grown during the “Gu” season, severe dryness has prevailed so far, with only some scattered, below-average rains occurring in late April and early May.  

Drought conditions also affected other major crop producing areas, including the Bay region's “sorghum belt”, which accounts for more than half of the country's sorghum production during the “Gu” season, and the “cowpea belt” in Middle Shabelle, Mudug and Galgaduud regions.

Drought takes a heavy toll on herders and their livestock

Poor rains since last October have also taken a heavy toll on herders and their livestock as vegetation has been drying up and water has been increasingly scarce.

The FAO alert warns of a worrying number of animals in very poor health conditions – due to low body weight and drought-induced diseases – in the country's central and northern regions.

“Herders in the worst drought-affected areas – such as central Galgaduud and in northern Bari and Sanaag regions – have been forced to slaughter the offspring of their goats and sheep as they don't have enough fodder and water for all their animals, and try to save the milk-producing female livestock,” said FAO Somalia Representative Serge Tissot.

“Many herders have not been able to replace livestock lost during the 2017 drought that ravaged the country, so they already have less resources. Now, on top of that, as food and water become scarcer, they have to pay higher prices for trucked-in water and their daily food,” added Tissot.

Action is needed now to prevent loss of lives

Drought and early depletion of food stocks, compounded by declining employment opportunities and low wages for farmers, shortages of livestock products in pastoral areas as well as both heightened conflict and a reduction of humanitarian assistance since early 2019 have all led to a sharp deterioration of the food security situation in the country.

FAO is scaling up its response to prevent an already alarming humanitarian situation from getting even worse. For this, FAO urgently needs more funds as it aims to support 2 million drought-affected people this year by providing critical livelihood support such as cash assistance, quality seeds, tools, and other agricultural services so farmers can make the most of the next planting season.

To protect their remaining livestock, herders require vital support such as water and supplementary feed. Countrywide animal health campaigns must also be rolled out quickly – starting with emergency livestock treatments to keep animals alive, healthy and productive.

Currently, FAO has a funding gap of about $115 million in Somalia.

Distributed by APO Group on behalf of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

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